Hector Lombard Names Top Ten Contenders For Possible Next Opponent

Although Hector Lombard dismissed calls to drop down from middleweight for some time, the former Bellator champ certainly made the most of his welterweight debut by violently taking out Nate Marquardt at UFC 166. As a result of the performance, it seems like the MMA world is buzzing about Lombard and what could come next.

So, not surprisingly, Lombard was asked about who he’s interested in fighting next will appearing on BJ Penn.com Radio recently. The 35 year-old fighter, who went 1-2 in the UFC middleweight division, had this to say:

“I think that Carlos Condit is high ranked, right?” Lombard asked, before also mentioning Martin Kampmann as a fighter he’d like to face. “OK, I’ll take Carlos Condit.”

Lombard was also asked about how he feels he would go against champion Georges St.Pierre, but the Judoka responded by saying:

“I don’t want to talk about that,” Lombard said, “because, you know, I have a long time to get there.  I want to get one of those guys [Condit or Kampmann] first.”

Fair enough. Since Condit is scheduled to fight Matt Brown at UFC on FOX 9, then chances are Lombard won’t be fighting the #2 ranked welterweight anytime soon. The #7 ranked Kampmann, on the other hand, isn’t booked for a bout and that’s certainly a promising fight on paper.

Whoever Lombard fights next, chances are they’ll be a well established vet like Marquardt.  Nick Diaz versus Lombard would certainly attract some interest no?

Stay tuned to MMA Frenzy.com for all your UFC news and coverage.

Source: http://mmafrenzy.com/95603/lombard-names-top-ten-contenders-for-next-fight/
Related Topics: Jacoby Jones   Big Brother 15  

Advertisements

Officials: 2 French journalists killed in Mali

This combination of undated photos provided by Radio France International shows journalists Ghislaine Dupont, left, and Claude Verlon. French and Malian officials said gunmen in Kidal, northern Mali abducted and killed the two French radio journalists on assignment Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, grabbing the pair as they left the home of a rebel leader. (AP Photo/RFI)

This combination of undated photos provided by Radio France International shows journalists Ghislaine Dupont, left, and Claude Verlon. French and Malian officials said gunmen in Kidal, northern Mali abducted and killed the two French radio journalists on assignment Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, grabbing the pair as they left the home of a rebel leader. (AP Photo/RFI)

In this picture taken July 26, 2013, Malian soldiers traveling in convoy across the desert arrive at the entrance to Kidal in northern Mali. Gunmen abducted and killed two French radio journalists on assignment in northern Mali on Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, French and Malian officials said, grabbing the pair as they left the home of a rebel leader. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

FILE – In this July 27, 2013 file photo, a French soldier patrols at dusk in a central market in Kidal, Mali. Mali’s military chief in Kidal said Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, that two journalists working for French radio station RFI have been kidnapped. RFI confirmed the kidnappings on its website, saying that journalists Ghislaine Dupont and Claude Verlon were taken at 1 p.m. Saturday by armed men in Kidal and have not been heard from since. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)

(AP) — Gunmen abducted and killed two French radio journalists on assignment in northern Mali on Saturday, French and Malian officials said, grabbing the pair as they left the home of a rebel leader.

The deaths come four days after France rejoiced at the release of four of its citizens who had been held for three years by al-Qaida’s affiliate in North Africa.

It was not immediately clear who had slain the Radio France Internationale journalists. France launched a military intervention in January in its former colony to try and oust jihadists from power in Kidal and other towns across northern Mali. Separatist rebels have since returned to the area.

French President Francois Hollande expressed his “indignation at this odious act.”

Claude Verlon and Ghislaine Dupont were grabbed by several armed men in a 4×4 after they finished an interview, officials said. Their bodies were later dumped a dozen kilometers (miles) outside the town on the road leading to Tinessako, a community to the east of Kidal, according to a person who saw the bodies and four officials briefed on the matter.

RFI described Dupont, 51, and Verlon, 58, as professionals with long experience in challenging areas.

Dupont was a journalist who was “passionate about her job and the African continent that she covered since joining RFI in 1986,” it said in a statement. Verlon was “used to difficult terrain throughout the world.”

Staff members “are all in shock, profoundly saddened, indignant and angry,” it said.

France opened a judicial investigation into the kidnappings and deaths “linked to a terrorist enterprise,” the prosecutor’s office said.

Suspicion in Saturday’s killings immediately fell on Islamist militants.

“From the information I have, their throats were cut. We don’t know for sure who took them, but the reports we are hearing indicate that they were Islamists,” said Lassana Camara, the deputy prefect of Tinessako.

Several Kidal officials interviewed by telephone said that the RFI journalists were abducted after an interview at the house of Ambeiry Ag Rhissa, the acting head of the National Movement for the Liberation of the Azawad, or NMLA, a Tuareg separatist movement whose rebels invaded northern Mali last year. Those rebels were later chased out by al-Qaida’s fighters in the region but have returned to prominence in Kidal in recent months.

Rhissa said in telephone interview with the France 24 TV station that he heard sounds and walked outside, where a vehicle had pulled up beside the journalists’ car. A man pointed a gun at him and said “Go inside, go inside.”

When they took off, “I heard a single gunshot,” he said. Rhissa said he didn’t see how many men were in the vehicle but said he was told by several people there were four.

Lt. Col. Oumar Sy, a Malian officer stationed in Kidal and involved in the investigation, said that everything pointed to the NMLA.

“We are in a town that is in the de facto hands of the NMLA. We learn that these poor people are taken in front of the house of an NMLA leader. No one lifts a finger to help them. What conclusion would you come to?” he said.

The French-led military operation succeeded in restoring government rule in all the regions formerly held by al-Qaida, with the exception of Kidal. Although the Malian military returned this summer, they remain mostly confined to their military base, largely unable to patrol the streets, where the NMLA rebels can still be seen zooming through the sand-enveloped paths aboard pickup trucks bearing the NMLA flag.

The French president called key ministers for a Sunday meeting in a first step to find out how and why the journalists were killed.

Hollande and Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita agreed in a phone call “to follow without let-up the fight against terrorist groups that remain present in northern Mali,” according to a statement from Hollande’s office.

The executive director of Reporters Without Borders, Christophe Deloire, expressed disgust in an interview with The Associated Press that “two experienced journalists can lose their lives because nefarious militias consider it normal to shoot.”

Since 2003, northern Mali also has acted as a rear base for al-Qaida’s North African branch, which has used the country’s vast deserts north of Kidal to train fighters, amass arms and prepare for war. They have bankrolled their operations by kidnapping Westerners, especially French nationals.

According to global intelligence unit Stratfor, al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb has carried out at least 18 successful kidnappings of foreigners in the past decade, netting at least $89 million in ransom payments.

Just last week, four Frenchmen kidnapped three years ago in neighboring Niger were released by the terrorist group in the deserts of northern Mali, allegedly for ransom of more than 10 million euros ($13.5 million), according to Pascal Lupart, the head of an association representing the friends and families of hostages held by the group.

Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb embedded itself in northern Mali in part by forging alliances with the Tuareg people, who have agitated for independence for the past half-century. Several of al-Qaida’s local commanders are believed to be Malian-born Tuaregs, with ties to both Kidal and the local separatist movement, the NMLA.

____

Ganley reported from Paris. Bastien Inzaurralde contributed from Paris.

___

Follow Ganley on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/Elaine_Ganley

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/cae69a7523db45408eeb2b3a98c0c9c5/Article_2013-11-02-Mali-Kidnapping/id-9731507cbee44824b29960567df4677b
Related Topics: miami dolphins   jack o lantern   The Crazy Ones   tupac   Placenta  

Docs to parents: Limit kids’ texts, tweets, online

In this Oct. 24, 2013 photo, Amy Risinger, right, watches her son Mark Risinger, 16, at their home in Glenview, Ill. Mark Risinger is allowed to use his smartphone and laptop in his room, and says he spends about four hours daily on the Internet doing homework, using Facebook and YouTube and watching movies. An influential pediatricians group is recommending strict limits on texting, tweeting and other media use, including banning smart phones, iPods and other Internet access from kids’ bedrooms. Mark’s mom said she agrees with restricting kids’ time on social media but that deciding on other media limits should be up to parents. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

In this Oct. 24, 2013 photo, Amy Risinger, right, watches her son Mark Risinger, 16, at their home in Glenview, Ill. Mark Risinger is allowed to use his smartphone and laptop in his room, and says he spends about four hours daily on the Internet doing homework, using Facebook and YouTube and watching movies. An influential pediatricians group is recommending strict limits on texting, tweeting and other media use, including banning smart phones, iPods and other Internet access from kids’ bedrooms. Mark’s mom said she agrees with restricting kids’ time on social media but that deciding on other media limits should be up to parents. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

In this Oct. 24, 2013 photo, Mark Risinger, 16, checks his Facebook page on his computer as his mother, Amy Risinger, looks on at their home in Glenview, Ill. The recommendations are bound to prompt eye-rolling and LOLs from many teens but an influential pediatrician’s group says unrestricted media use has been linked with violence, cyber-bullying, school woes, obesity, lack of sleep and a host of other problems. Mark’s mom said she agrees with restricting kids’ time on social media but that deciding on other media limits should be up to parents. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

In this Oct. 24, 2013 photo, Mark Risinger, 16, checks his smartphone at home in Glenview, Ill. Risinger is allowed to use his smartphone and laptop in his room, and says he spends about four hours daily on the Internet doing homework, using Facebook and YouTube and watching movies. An influential pediatrician’s group is recommending strict limits on texting, tweeting and other media use, including banning smart phones, iPods and other Internet access from kids’ bedrooms. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

(AP) — Doctors 2 parents: Limit kids’ tweeting, texting & keep smartphones, laptops out of bedrooms. #goodluckwiththat.

The recommendations are bound to prompt eye-rolling and LOLs from many teens but an influential pediatricians group says parents need to know that unrestricted media use can have serious consequences.

It’s been linked with violence, cyberbullying, school woes, obesity, lack of sleep and a host of other problems. It’s not a major cause of these troubles, but “many parents are clueless” about the profound impact media exposure can have on their children, said Dr. Victor Strasburger, lead author of the new American Academy of Pediatrics policy

“This is the 21st century and they need to get with it,” said Strasburger, a University of New Mexico adolescent medicine specialist.

The policy is aimed at all kids, including those who use smartphones, computers and other Internet-connected devices. It expands the academy’s longstanding recommendations on banning televisions from children’s and teens’ bedrooms and limiting entertainment screen time to no more than two hours daily.

Under the new policy, those two hours include using the Internet for entertainment, including Facebook, Twitter, TV and movies; online homework is an exception.

The policy statement cites a 2010 report that found U.S. children aged 8 to 18 spend an average of more than seven hours daily using some kind of entertainment media. Many kids now watch TV online and many send text messages from their bedrooms after “lights out,” including sexually explicit images by cellphone or Internet, yet few parents set rules about media use, the policy says.

“I guarantee you that if you have a 14-year-old boy and he has an Internet connection in his bedroom, he is looking at pornography,” Strasburger said.

The policy notes that three-quarters of kids aged 12 to 17 own cellphones; nearly all teens send text messages, and many younger kids have phones giving them online access.

“Young people now spend more time with media than they do in school — it is the leading activity for children and teenagers other than sleeping” the policy says.

Mark Risinger, 16, of Glenview, Ill., is allowed to use his smartphone and laptop in his room, and says he spends about four hours daily on the Internet doing homework, using Facebook and YouTube and watching movies.

He said a two-hour Internet time limit “would be catastrophic” and that kids won’t follow the advice, “they’ll just find a way to get around it.”

Strasburger said he realizes many kids will scoff at advice from pediatricians — or any adults.

“After all, they’re the experts! We’re media-Neanderthals to them,” he said. But he said he hopes it will lead to more limits from parents and schools, and more government research on the effects of media.

The policy was published online Monday in the journal Pediatrics. It comes two weeks after police arrested two Florida girls accused of bullying a classmate who committed suicide. Police say one of the girls recently boasted online about the bullying and the local sheriff questioned why the suspects’ parents hadn’t restricted their Internet use.

Mark’s mom, Amy Risinger, said she agrees with restricting kids’ time on social media but that deciding on other media limits should be up to parents.

“I think some children have a greater maturity level and you don’t need to be quite as strict with them,” said Risinger, who runs a communications consulting firm.

Her 12-year-old has sneaked a laptop into bed a few times and ended up groggy in the morning, “so that’s why the rules are now in place, that that device needs to be in mom and dad’s room before he goes to bed.”

Sara Gorr, a San Francisco sales director and mother of girls, ages 13 and 15, said she welcomes the academy’s recommendations.

Her girls weren’t allowed to watch the family’s lone TV until a few years ago. The younger one has a tablet, and the older one has a computer and smartphone, and they’re told not to use them after 9 p.m.

“There needs to be more awareness,” Gorr said. “Kids are getting way too much computer time. It’s bad for their socialization, it’s overstimulating, it’s numbing them.”

___

Follow AP Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner at http://www.twitter.com.LindseyTanner

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/bbd825583c8542898e6fa7d440b9febc/Article_2013-10-28-Curbing%20Kids%20Online/id-650fe35d097b4e3cbbb8f7ee548d3108
Tags: world trade center   obama speech   the league   bay bridge   Rafael Caro Quintero  

Going deep to study long-term climate evolution

Going deep to study long-term climate evolution

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

1-Nov-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Rice geoscientists building whole-Earth model for long-term climate clues


HOUSTON — (Oct. 31, 2013) — A Rice University-based team of geoscientists is going to great lengths — from Earth’s core to its atmosphere — to get to the bottom of a long-standing mystery about the planet’s climate.

“We want to know what controls long-term climate change on Earth, the oscillations between greenhouse and icehouse cycles that can last as long as tens of million years,” said Cin-Ty Lee, professor of Earth science at Rice and the principal investigator (PI) on a new $4.3 million, five-year federal grant from the National Science Foundation’s Frontiers in Earth-System Dynamics (FESD) Program.

“There are long periods where Earth is relatively cool, like today, where you have ice caps on the North and South poles, and there are also long periods where there are no ice caps,” Lee said. “Earth’s climate has oscillated between these two patterns for at least half a billion years. We want to understand what controls these oscillations, and we have people at universities across the country who are going to attack this problem from many angles.”

For starters, Lee distinguished between the type of climate change that he and his co-investigators are studying and the anthropogenic climate change that often makes headlines.

“We’re working on much longer timescales than what’s involved in anthropogenic climate change,” Lee said. “We’re interested in explaining processes that cycle over tens of millions of years.”

Lee described the research team as “a patchwork of free spirits” that includes bikers, birdwatchers and skateboarders who are drawn together by a common interest in studying the whole Earth dynamics of carbon exchange. The group has specialists in oceanography, petrology, geodynamics, biogeochemistry and other fields, and it includes more than a dozen faculty and students from the U.S., Europe and Asia. Rice co-PIs include Rajdeep Dasgupta, Gerald Dickens and Adrian Lenardic.

The team will focus on how carbon moves between Earth’s external and internal systems. On the external side, carbon is known to cycle between oceans, atmosphere, biosphere and soils on timescales ranging from a few days to a few hundred thousand years. On million-year to billion-year timescales, carbon in these external reservoirs interacts with reservoirs inside Earth, ranging from crustal carbon stored in ancient sediments preserved on the continents to carbon deep in Earth’s mantle.

“Because of these differences in timescales, carbon cycling at Earth’s surface is typically modeled independently from deep-Earth cycling,” Lee said. “We need to bring the two together if we are to understand long-term greenhouse-icehouse cycling.”

From the fossil record, scientists know that atmospheric carbon dioxide plays a vital role in determining Earth’s surface temperatures. Many studies have focused on how carbon moves between the atmosphere, oceans and biosphere. Lee said the FESD team will examine how carbon is removed from the surface and cycled back into the deep Earth, and it will also examine how volcanic eruptions bring carbon from the deep Earth to the surface. In addition, the team will examine the role that volcanic activity and plate tectonics may play in periodically releasing enormous volumes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. One of several hypotheses that will be tested is whether Earth’s subduction zones may at times be dominated by continental arcs, and if so, whether the passage of magmas through ancient carbonates stored in the continental upper plate can amplify the volcanic flux of carbon.

“Long-term climate variability is intimately linked to whole-Earth carbon cycling,” Lee said. “Our task is to build up a clearer picture of how the inputs and outputs change through time.”

In addition to the Rice team, the project’s primary investigators include Jaime Barnes of the University of Texas at Austin, Jade Star Lackey of Pomona College, Michael Tice of Texas A&M University and Richard Zeebe of the University of Hawaii. Research affiliates include Steve Bergman of Shell, Mark Jellinek of the University of British Columbia, Tapio Schneider of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and Yusuke Yokoyama of the University of Tokyo.

###

For more information about the research, visit http://arc2climate.org.


High-resolution IMAGES are available for download at:
http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/1104_FESD-earth-lg.jpg

CAPTION: A Rice University-based team of geoscientists is going to great lengths — from Earth’s core to its atmosphere — to investigate the role that deep-Earth processes play in climate evolution over million-year timescales.

CREDIT: Rice University


A copy of the NSF grant abstract is available at:
http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1338842

http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=128983&org=NSF

Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/AboutRiceU.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Going deep to study long-term climate evolution

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

1-Nov-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Rice geoscientists building whole-Earth model for long-term climate clues


HOUSTON — (Oct. 31, 2013) — A Rice University-based team of geoscientists is going to great lengths — from Earth’s core to its atmosphere — to get to the bottom of a long-standing mystery about the planet’s climate.

“We want to know what controls long-term climate change on Earth, the oscillations between greenhouse and icehouse cycles that can last as long as tens of million years,” said Cin-Ty Lee, professor of Earth science at Rice and the principal investigator (PI) on a new $4.3 million, five-year federal grant from the National Science Foundation’s Frontiers in Earth-System Dynamics (FESD) Program.

“There are long periods where Earth is relatively cool, like today, where you have ice caps on the North and South poles, and there are also long periods where there are no ice caps,” Lee said. “Earth’s climate has oscillated between these two patterns for at least half a billion years. We want to understand what controls these oscillations, and we have people at universities across the country who are going to attack this problem from many angles.”

For starters, Lee distinguished between the type of climate change that he and his co-investigators are studying and the anthropogenic climate change that often makes headlines.

“We’re working on much longer timescales than what’s involved in anthropogenic climate change,” Lee said. “We’re interested in explaining processes that cycle over tens of millions of years.”

Lee described the research team as “a patchwork of free spirits” that includes bikers, birdwatchers and skateboarders who are drawn together by a common interest in studying the whole Earth dynamics of carbon exchange. The group has specialists in oceanography, petrology, geodynamics, biogeochemistry and other fields, and it includes more than a dozen faculty and students from the U.S., Europe and Asia. Rice co-PIs include Rajdeep Dasgupta, Gerald Dickens and Adrian Lenardic.

The team will focus on how carbon moves between Earth’s external and internal systems. On the external side, carbon is known to cycle between oceans, atmosphere, biosphere and soils on timescales ranging from a few days to a few hundred thousand years. On million-year to billion-year timescales, carbon in these external reservoirs interacts with reservoirs inside Earth, ranging from crustal carbon stored in ancient sediments preserved on the continents to carbon deep in Earth’s mantle.

“Because of these differences in timescales, carbon cycling at Earth’s surface is typically modeled independently from deep-Earth cycling,” Lee said. “We need to bring the two together if we are to understand long-term greenhouse-icehouse cycling.”

From the fossil record, scientists know that atmospheric carbon dioxide plays a vital role in determining Earth’s surface temperatures. Many studies have focused on how carbon moves between the atmosphere, oceans and biosphere. Lee said the FESD team will examine how carbon is removed from the surface and cycled back into the deep Earth, and it will also examine how volcanic eruptions bring carbon from the deep Earth to the surface. In addition, the team will examine the role that volcanic activity and plate tectonics may play in periodically releasing enormous volumes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. One of several hypotheses that will be tested is whether Earth’s subduction zones may at times be dominated by continental arcs, and if so, whether the passage of magmas through ancient carbonates stored in the continental upper plate can amplify the volcanic flux of carbon.

“Long-term climate variability is intimately linked to whole-Earth carbon cycling,” Lee said. “Our task is to build up a clearer picture of how the inputs and outputs change through time.”

In addition to the Rice team, the project’s primary investigators include Jaime Barnes of the University of Texas at Austin, Jade Star Lackey of Pomona College, Michael Tice of Texas A&M University and Richard Zeebe of the University of Hawaii. Research affiliates include Steve Bergman of Shell, Mark Jellinek of the University of British Columbia, Tapio Schneider of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and Yusuke Yokoyama of the University of Tokyo.

###

For more information about the research, visit http://arc2climate.org.


High-resolution IMAGES are available for download at:
http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/1104_FESD-earth-lg.jpg

CAPTION: A Rice University-based team of geoscientists is going to great lengths — from Earth’s core to its atmosphere — to investigate the role that deep-Earth processes play in climate evolution over million-year timescales.

CREDIT: Rice University


A copy of the NSF grant abstract is available at:
http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1338842

http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=128983&org=NSF

Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/AboutRiceU.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/ru-gdt110113.php
Related Topics: Texas A&m   eric decker   steelers   Alexian Lien   What Does Government Shutdown Mean  

The NASA Engineer Who Made iPads the Future of Halloween

Two years ago, NASA engineer Mark Rober blew YouTube’s mind with a video of his Halloween costume: a hole in his chest. Or at least it looked like a hole in his chest. In fact, it was an optical illusion made possible by two iPads, a little duct tape and a lot of ingenuity. Well, you won’t believe what he’s been up to since then.

Read more…

    



Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/KaTPzh5Ha6s/the-nasa-engineer-who-made-ipads-the-future-of-hallowee-1454314362
Category: Roosevelt Field Mall   apple stock   ellie goulding   powerball winning numbers   Ryne Sandberg